Outreach

 

Volunteer Program Assessment (VPA, pronounced vee-pah): 

VPA is a cutting-edge, innovative, and completely free volunteer assessment system designed to promote nonprofit organizational effectiveness.

The Volunteer Program Assessment (VPA) was developed in 2009 by students and faculty in the Organizational Science doctoral program.

VPA is an online survey that measures a number of key individual (e.g., satisfaction with communication) and organizational outcomes (e.g., intentions to quit).  VPA consultants work with clients to guide them through the survey process, support the survey collection, create aggregated results reports, and interpret the survey results.  Thanks to grants and support from the Humane Society of the United States and UNC Charlotte, clients receive this service at no cost. 

Since its founding, VPA has served over 100 volunteer programs from across the United States and Canada.  In addition, VPA has expanded to other universities, including Creighton University, George Mason University, and Illinois State University.  Through continued and expanded outreach efforts, VPA strives to provide an opportunity for volunteer managers to learn, meet, and grow.

For more information regarding VPA please visit this media report:

UNC Charlotte's Innovative Assessment System Helps Non Profits Nurture Volunteers

For more information regarding VPA please visit its website.

Organizational Science Summer Institute (OSSI):

  •  The Organizational Science Summer Institute is designed to provide underrepresented undergraduate students with a unique educational opportunity by providing experiences to foster interest and ability in research, scholarship, application and graduate study while in a supportive graduate climate that values multiple diverse perspectives (e.g. disciplinary, demographic, methodology, and intellectual).
  • The Organizational Science Summer Institute (OSSI) was recently featured in a news release by the University.
  • The Organizational Science Summer Institute is designed to provide underrepresented undergraduate students with a unique educational opportunity with the following goals:
  • Foster undergraduate interest and ability in research, scholarship, application and graduate study
  • Provide hands on development of research conceptualization, writing, and presentation skills and intense GRE training
  • Expose students to a supportive graduate climate that values multiple diverse perspectives (e.g. disciplinary, demographic, methodology, and intellectual)
  • Demonstrate to participants that a career in organizational science offers an exciting challenge and that they are fully capable of such careers
  • Ten rising juniors and seniors (from this point called “Fellows”) from around the US will be housed at UNC Charlotte. Participants of the OSSI will engage in a number of activities including, but not limited to.
  • One-on-one meetings with faculty and current graduate students to discuss research interests and develop a research project
  • GRE prep classes
  • Networking with other participants
  • Meeting with successful professionals in the field of Organizational Science
  • Intensive seminars on the research process
  • For more information regarding OSSI please visit its website.

The Power of Yet:

  •  The Power of Yet is a school-based youth development program intended to introduce elementary-grade students to concepts of growth mindset, self-leadership, resilience and self-talk to promote healthy coping strategies to persist in tasks toward more positive educational outcomes.
  • The Power of Yet is an ongoing "school-based youth development program intended to introduce elementary grade students to concepts of growth mindset, self-leadership, resilience and self-talk to promote healthy coping strategies to persist in tasks toward more positive educational outcomes. Drawing from psychology, education, and management literature focusing on self-leadership, the “Yet” program encourages interaction and internalization of concepts such as “growing the brain,” and “stinkin’ thinking,” while modeling how to reframe set-backs to things students have not mastered…”yet”" (Rogelberg, Uhrich, Caudill, Gur, Moffit, Williams, & Rogelberg, 2016).

    For more information, please see this recent publication in the Journal of Youth Development.